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The New Garden is an Old Favorite

The New Garden is an Old Favorite http://www.pokingaroundthehome.com/articles/250/1/The-New-Garden-is-an-Old-Favorite By Published on 09/26/2005

Suddenly, everywhere you turn, you see flowers in window boxes, pots, and other containers. It seems like everyone is gardening in their windows. This new garden fad is actually an old, well established gardening method that just wasn't very popular until recently in the United States. Window gardening is so simple and fun, that it is amazing that it took so long for it to become a hot gardening trend.





-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The New Garden is an Old Favorite Suddenly, everywhere you turn, you see flowers in window boxes, pots, and other containers. It seems like everyone is gardening in their windows. This new garden fad is actually an old, well established gardening method that just wasn't very popular until recently in the United States. Window gardening is so simple and fun, that it is amazing that it took so long for it to become a hot gardening trend.

One reason for the popularity of window gardening today is that many people simply don't have yard space for gardening. More and more people are living in apartments, condos, and townhouses with little or no garden area. They use window gardening to bring a bit of nature into their lives.

Another reason window gardening is becoming the new way to garden is that large gardens simply take up too much time for busy people to maintain. As their lives become more stressful, these people look for ways to relax. Since there are few things as peaceful and tranquil as flowers, it is no surprise that stressed and tired people are turning to gardening in some form.

Before you create a window garden, you will need to decide how you want your garden to look. If you want to create a display with a formal but attractive appearance, you may want to select wrought iron window boxes with glass inserts or lightweight boxes that look like they are made from stone. For a more rustic appearance, take a look at cedar or pine window boxes. If you are on a tight budget, molded plastic boxes are an economical alternative to pricier window boxes.

Once you decide on a window box style, you will need to prepare your window box for planting. You may want to install the box beneath your window before you add the additional weight of potting soil and plants, as a full window box can be a bit heavy. Once your window box is in place, you will need to fill it to approximately four inches from the top with a mixture of potting soil and water retaining crystals.

Now, you are ready to plant your window garden. Most people place flowering plants in their window boxes, such as geraniums, pansies, and petunias. For contrast, you should add a few foliage plants to your box. variegated Vinca, sweet potato vines, Dusty Miller, and Licorice Plant are all good choices.

For people who don't care for flowers, a few miniature evergreens may be the perfect window box plants. Dwarf Alberta Spruce have a nice triangular appearance, while Mugho Pines form rounded mounds. Both of these plants grow so slowly in window boxes that they shouldn't grow too large for five or so years.

If you crave fresh vegetables, why not turn your window garden into your own miniature vegetable garden? You can start your garden from seeds or you can buy a six pack of starter plants. Ideal vegetables for a window box are lettuce, peppers, and onions. However, if you place a trellis in your box, you could also try a patio tomato or spring peas.

For people who love to cook, an herb window garden is a wonderful idea. Add chives, basil, parsley, and thyme to your window box and soon you will have fresh herbs for your recipes.

Once your plants are in place, fill in around their roots with more of your potting soil mix. Press the soil firmly into place and water your window garden. Don't forget to add a layer of mulch to be sure your plants do not dry out too fast.

If you are afraid that a window box will make your home look too formal, you may want to try using other containers for your plants. One option is to paint several coffee cans in bright colors. Punch a few drainage holes in the bottom of each can and add top soil. Add a geranium to each can and line the cans up on a window sill to create a colorful display with a country feel. If you aren't a coffee drinker, you can substitute other items, such as cowboy boots, decorative tins, or wooden crates, for the coffee cans.

Once you have a window garden, don't be surprised if they start sprouting up in your neighbors' windows, too.

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Article Source: Pokingaroundthehome.com

 

 

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